Feb 9 2009

Conquering Clutter the Hudson Guild Way

Hoarding and decluttering have recently graced the pages of two major lifestyle magazines: Domino and Real Simple. In the February 2009 issue of Domino, interior designer Ryan Korban offers pack-rats solutions to clearing out clutter. In the March 2009 issue of Real Simple, a reformed hoarder, Erin Rooney Doland, discusses how she was able to purge her excess belongings.

With an estimated 4.5 million Americans suffering from compulsive hoarding, it’s no surprise that discussions on hoarding have become ubiquitous. Oprah.com has over 40 articles devoted to decluttering your home.

Here are a few simple tips on decluttering that I picked up from my experience attending the Hudson Guild decluttering support group meeting:

Don’t discard items – donate them!


Anna-Leah Braudes, the moderator of the Hudson Guild decluttering support group, said that it’s less stressful for hoarders to donate items rather than discard them. Most hoarders have an easier time giving up belongings if they can give it to someone who appreciates them. Braudes recommends donating clothes to the Salvation Army and books to Merchant Marines.

As for items like newspapers, Braudes says that purging papers is very difficult to tackle because of their frequent delivery. She added that hoarders like to randomly clip articles from the paper, but fail to file them in a place where they’ll have easy access to them at a later date. It was suggested at one of the meetings that hoarders should cancel their subscriptions to publications because most information is now available via the web through a publication’s online archive. Articles can easily be bookmarked or forwarded to a personal email account for quick future reference.

Acquiring decision-making skills

During each of her meetings, Braudes emphasizes to her members how important it is to acquire decision-making skills before discarding items. She says that if a hoarder discards an item without understanding why they’re discarding it, they’ll be more likely to repossess that item at a later date.

Braudes says that professional help, such as hoarding expert, Dr. Randy Frost’s, cognitive behavioral therapy for hoarding, can help hoarders tackle obstacles that they cannot handle on their own.

Below is a list of a few programs that offer professional therapy for hoarding:

Bio Behavioral Institute –  (Great Neck, NY)

UCLA – OCD Intensive Treatment Program (Los Angeles, CA)

The Institute of Living – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (Hartford, CT)

Seeing it for yourself

Not too long ago, Braudes suggested a bold idea, that as a group her members visit each other’s home so that they can visualize what each person is referring to during group discussions. But to date, no one has accepted Braudes’s suggestion. In fact, several members ended up dropping out of the group to prevent this from happening.

Braudes believes if hoarders can view the clutter of others in-person, it will encourage them to look at their own clutter more objectively. Often times, Braudes’ members relate to the items being talked about and, she said this serves as an obvious way of helping each other.


Jan 9 2009

Hoarding In The New Year

We’ve all returned from our winter break and are ready to get back to work on this important project. Coincidentally, hoarding is making the headlines. The Sun is reporting two hoarding deaths occurred in the same week across the pond in the United Kingdom.

The tabloid reports Gordon Stewart, 74, may have died of dehydration when he became disoriented and got lost in an elaborate maze of tunnels he had dug out of boxes and random debris he had hoarded for years. Like many hoarders, the story notes that officials believe Stewart had no living relatives. From the few pictures The Sun posted on its website it looks like Stewart was an extreme Level 5 hoarder. 

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

Photo Credit: The Sun

Photo Credit: The Sun

 

 

 

 

Two things stuck out for me from this story. First, Gordon Stewart is a man. From our research we’ve found this affliction is more common among Caucasian widowed or single women. Second, his neighbors alerted the police only when they hadn’t seen him come outside for a few days. It’s an interesting contrast to Catherine’s case because her neighbors have alerted health and county officials who have threatened to take her house away if she doesn’t clean up at least two rooms. I wonder why Gordon Stewart’s neighbors and local British authorities put up with the trash and debris outside his house while Catherine’s neighbors and county officials insist on her getting parts of her house cleaned ASAP? 

The second story reports that Joan Cunnane, 77, was buried alive “under 3ft of ornaments, clothes in suitcases and electrical goods, still in their untouched packaging”, she had hoarded for 16 years.

Joan was a borderline level four/five hoarder. She is more typical of hoarding cases because she was white and never married. 

 

Photo Credit: The Sun and Cavendish Press

Photo Credit: The Sun and Cavendish Press

 

 

Joan had the same problem that Catherine has with her car. The hoarding spread to her car with only room to seat the driver. The story also highlights the effect this disorder has on the physical safety of people living and interacting in a hoarding situation. Joan’s best friend, Roy Moran told The Sun about the danger he faced when he’d visit with her. 

“There were thousands of videos. When I walked in they fell down. It was a death-trap.” 

Photo Credit: The Sun and Cavendish Press

Photo Credit: The Sun and Cavendish Press.